A glimpse into the past

Statue outside The National Archives

Statue outside The National Archives

It took us a little under 3 hours to see the Emancipation Proclamation at The National Archives Monday. The museum rarely shows the document, a 5-page document that President Abraham Lincoln issued on Jan. 1, 1863, that declared slaves held in Confederate states free during the third year of the American Civil War.

The National Archives was showing the document for only four days, Feb. 12-16, in honor of the Lincoln’s 200th birthday. While Lincoln is not my favorite president ( F Roosevelt is), it was still interesting to see the document. Here’s a picture of it.

The Emancipation Proclamation

The Emancipation Proclamation

We had to wait outside for around 45 minutes, where we talked to two students from Georgetown University, before we were able to get inside the museum. The security guard was unsure on whether to believe it was only a cough drop in my mouth-I had to show her, and once inside we had to wait another 45 minutes. However, I did get to look at the Magna Carta during my wait and search for the 9 eagles hidden inside the rotunda.

The Magna Carta

The Magna Carta

 After the long afternoon, during which it briefly snowed twice, Caylah and I were finally able to make it back to the metro station to head home.

Waiting for the train with Caylah

Waiting for the train with Caylah

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