Photo: Snowy Owls in Arkansas

I’ve always wanted to see a Snowy Owl. It was the #1 bird on my birds-to-see list. I finally got the chance earlier this month. A pair of Snowy Owls visited a farm in Northeast Arkansas. During my visit, the pair were in different fields separated by a county road. I could see both where I was parked, although one was further from the road than the other.

Snowy Owls are the largest North American owl by weight. According to allaboutbirds.org, they spend summers far north of the Arctic Circle. Some might migrate in the winter to southern Canada and the very northern parts of the United States.

One neat fact about the Snowy Owl is that, unlike most owls, they hunt at all hours, according to All About Birds. I saw the pair mid-afternoon. They were extremely skittish, but below are a few more photos.

Photos: Rufous Hummingbird

This rusty-colored adult male hummingbird has made a temporary home in Benton. The homeowner was gracious enough to let me stop by Thursday to see the Rufous Hummingbird. He was a little shy, but he hung out around the back patio area and in the wooded backyard for most of my visit.

Rufous Hummingbirds are usually found out western United States. According to allaboutbirds.org, they travel about 4,000 miles from breeding grounds in Alaska/ northwest Canada to wintering sites in Mexico.

Rare find: Say’s Phoebe

Say's Phoebe 2102719 BKNWR

Yesterday, I made a trip back to my hometown in Northeast Arkansas and, naturally, I couldn’t resist stopping at Bald Knob National Wildlife Refuge on my way back to see what birds I could find.

I got lucky. Right off the bat, I found a Say’s Phoebe – which is rare to the area according to eBird.org. The Say’s Phoebe is a medium-sized flycatcher that is typically found in the western part of the United States.