Drumroll … New bird visitor at my home

I’ve lived in Stuttgart for three years this August. During this time, my main feathered visitors have been house sparrows, cardinals, doves, American robins and blackbirds. And, of course, the occasional cedar waxwing.

Now, I love having these constant birds. Don’t get me wrong, but I decided late last summer I wanted for more variety. And I finally took action after months of just thinking about it. I actually kept my feeders full, switching to a more fruitier blend to attract another variety of birds (which my usual crowd still likes) and put up my first hummingbird feeder.

The results were slow. I received my first hummingbird late last summer. This spring, I woke up to a rose-breasted grosbeak singing at my feeder. And I recently discovered the below American goldfinch. Today, I finally had what I believe was a House finch.

I see most of the birds first thing in the morning, around 7 to 7:30. And honestly, the finds are a great energy boost for my day. So, hopefully the birds will keep on visiting.

IMG_3266

IMG_3268

 

New visitors

Rose-breasted Grosbeak
Rose-breasted Grosbeak

A strange chirping woke me up this morning. It was a Rose-breasted Grosbeak — a first at my house. However, he wasn’t alone. It was joined by another first, three White-crowned Sparrows, and eventually a Ruby-Throated Hummingbird. The sparrows and hummingbird returned throughout the day. Not a bad start to the week.

White-crowned Sparrow
White-crowned Sparrow
Ruby-throated Hummingbird
Ruby-throated Hummingbird

A Subway stalking

I hate cooking. I’ll just let that be known from the start.

With that in mind, it wasn’t really that hard for me to decide to eat out last night and to choose my favorite fast-food place: Subway. It turned out to be a great decision.

Not only did I have a great meal, but I also found a Scissor-tailed Flycatcher. It was sitting on a pole just as I got back in my car. Naturally, I had to get closer. I ended up feeling like a stalker as I drove around the parking lot of Subway and a next-door gas station to get a better picture.

Still, I got my picture. All’s well that ends well (at least in this case).

Scissortail Flycatcher1

 

Bayou Meto springtime

Barn Swallows
Barn Swallows

I typically visit the Bayou Meto Wildlife Management Area in the fall and winter — never spring and summer. I broke tradition this year by taking a late afternoon drive through the area with Izzie. Boy, was I glad I did. There were Barn Swallows, Dickcissels and Ruby-Throated Hummingbirds at the Halowell Reservoir while Indigo Buntings and Blue Grosbeaks lined the roads leading to and from the reservoir. Overall, it was a pretty drive with a gorgeous sunset (see the last pictures).

Barn Swallow2
Barn Swallow
Blue Grosbeak, Female1
female Blue Grosbeak
Blue Grosbeak, male
male Blue Grosbeak
Dickcissel, pair
A pair of Dickcissel

flowers1

Goose, Snow and Greater White-fronted
Geese — a snow and a greater white-fronted — that each had a drooping wing.

flowers2

Indigo Bunting
Indigo Bunting
RT Hummingbird1
female Ruby-throated Hummingbird
RT Hummingbird2
male Ruby-throated Hummingbird
Sandpiper, Spotted1
Spotted Sandpiper

sunset

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Photo essay: A Jolly Rogers good time!

1-Bonaparte's Gulls w:Ring-Billed Gull w:fish
A Bonaparte’s Gull comes out of the water with a fish at Jolly Roger’s Marina while other Bonaparte’s Gulls and a Ring-Billed Gull circle above.
18-Yellow-rumped Warbler
A Yellow-rumped Warbler watched us eat at a park.
2-Bonaparte's Gull, first winter herring gull, Ring Billed Gull
A Bonaparte’s Gull (from left), a first winter Herring Gull, and a Ring Billed Gull flying. The Herring was being chased by the other two at one point.
3-Bonaparte's Gull
The Bonaparte’s Gulls were the most abundant.
4-Bonaparte's Gulls w:fish
Bonaparte’s Gulls dive for fish.
5-Bonaparte's gulls, common loon
Bonaparte’s Gulls fly above a Common Loon resurfacing with a fish.
6-Canada Goose3
We headed to the farthest point in the marina dock and was met with a pair of Canada Geese.
7-Canada Goose2
Eventually, the female laid down beside us. The next day, she laid three to four eggs in the same spot.
8-Canada Goose4
The male tolerated us in their area, but not other Canada Geese. He would chase them away and then swim back in the above place.
9-Common Loon2
A Common Loon was the first to bravely swim near us.
10-Common Loon, pacific loon
Later, we would spot a Pacific Loon with other Common Loons.
11-Common Loon, Red-breasted Mergansers
eventually Red-breasted Mergansers joined the Common Loon.
12-Red-breasted Mergansers
More Red-breasted Mergansers swam past us to where the boats were docked.
13-Red-breasted Mergansers2
The darn gulls wouldn’t leave the Red-breasted Mergansers alone.
14-Common Loon, Bufflehead
A Common Loon and a lone Bufflehead get scared off along with a Bonaparte’s Gull.
15-Red-breasted Mergansers, gulls-bonaparte's and herring
Near the end, the gulls went a little crazy with the Red-breasted Mergansers and the loons (not pictured) at the center.
16-Bufflehead Ducks1
Finally, the Bufflehead Ducks headed in.
17-Flowers
We finally decided to leave our new Canada Geese friends and head home. I couldn’t resist this picture.
19-Eastern Phoebe
I had just called it quits when this Eastern Phoebe appeared as I was leaving a Little Rock birder’s home. A nice way to end the day.